German Shepherd

Overview

Temperament: 

Confident, Courageous, Smart

AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 2 of 194

Height: 24-26 inches (male), 22-24 inches (female)

Weight: 65-90 pounds (male), 50-70 pounds (female)

Life Expectancy: 9-13 years

Group: Herding Group

BRINGING YOUR PUPPY HOME

Von Reich Haus exclusively breeds 100% AKC puppies and are all AKC-Registered litters. AKC registered breeders who have cared for and raise puppies are required to follow rules and regulations established by the AKC.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The first impression of a good German Shepherd Dog is that of a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life. It is well balanced, with harmonious development of the forequarter and hindquarter. The dog is longer than tall, deep-bodied, and presents an outline of smooth curves rather than angles. It looks substantial and not spindly, giving the impression, both at rest and in motion, of muscular fitness and nimbleness without any look of clumsiness or soft living. The ideal dog is stamped with a look of quality and nobility – difficult to define, but unmistakable when present. Secondary sex characteristics are strongly marked, and every animal gives a definite impression of masculinity or femininity, according to its sex.

OVERVIEW

Overview

Temperament: 

Confident, Courageous, Smart

AKC Breed Popularity: Ranks 2 of 194

Height: 24-26 inches (male), 22-24 inches (female)

Weight: 65-90 pounds (male), 50-70 pounds (female)

Life Expectancy: 9-13 years

Group: Herding Group

PUPPIES

BRINGING YOUR PUPPY HOME

Von Reich Haus exclusively breeds 100% AKC puppies and are all AKC-Registered litters. AKC registered breeders who have cared for and raise puppies are required to follow rules and regulations established by the AKC.

BREED STANDARD

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The first impression of a good German Shepherd Dog is that of a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life. It is well balanced, with harmonious development of the forequarter and hindquarter. The dog is longer than tall, deep-bodied, and presents an outline of smooth curves rather than angles. It looks substantial and not spindly, giving the impression, both at rest and in motion, of muscular fitness and nimbleness without any look of clumsiness or soft living. The ideal dog is stamped with a look of quality and nobility – difficult to define, but unmistakable when present. Secondary sex characteristics are strongly marked, and every animal gives a definite impression of masculinity or femininity, according to its sex.

Care

A high-quality dog food appropriate for the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) will have all the nutrients the breed needs. Table scraps can cause digestive upset, so only give them sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with high fat content. Small pieces of biscuit or the dog’s kibble can be used as treats for training. If you are feeding a high-quality food, vitamin and mineral supplements should not be necessary, although adding small quantities of yogurt, cooked vegetables, or eggs to the food can be beneficial. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

The German Shepherd Dog has a medium-length, double coat consisting of a dense, harsh, and close-lying outer coat with a softer undercoat. The breed is easy to maintain, usually requiring just a quick brushing every few days or so to help remove loose hairs, but they do shed more profusely once or twice a year. During these periods, more frequent brushing will help control the amount of hair that ends up around the house and on the furniture. The German Shepherd only needs an occasional bath. It is important to trim or grind his nails every month if they are not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause pain and structural issues.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional

2-3 Times a Week Brushing

Infrequent
Frequent

Seasonal

Early socialization and puppy training classes are vital, and continuing obedience training will help ensure that the pup will grow to be an adaptable and well-mannered adult. The German Shepherd is a highly intelligent companion and an extraordinary worker. Consistency and positive, reward-based training will yield excellent results. He is extremely bonded to his people, so he is happiest when he lives with his family. He should be raised in the household and exposed to the family’s activities. The German Shepherd Dog Club of America provides detailed training advice for owners on the club’s website.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please

Independent

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing

Alert/Responsive

Most German Shepherds are healthy dogs. A responsible breeder will screen breeding stock for health conditions such as degenerative myelopathy and elbow and hip dysplasia. German Shepherd Dogs can experience bloat, a sudden and life-threatening swelling of the abdomen, and owners should educate themselves about its symptoms and what to do should bloat occur.

 

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Elbow Evaluation

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

As a very active and athletic breed, the German Shepherd requires lots of exercise for his physical and mental well-being. A dog who is not exercised enough will become frustrated and likely to develop undesirable behaviors. With a puppy, you can start with short daily walks, as well as play sessions in a safely fenced area. Remember to not let the dog off leash, as even the best-trained dog can become distracted and not follow every command. Participating in canine activities such as agilityherdingtracking, and dock diving provides excellent physical and mental exercise and is fun and rewarding for both dog and owner.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity

Regular Exercise

NUTRITION

A high-quality dog food appropriate for the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) will have all the nutrients the breed needs. Table scraps can cause digestive upset, so only give them sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with high fat content. Small pieces of biscuit or the dog’s kibble can be used as treats for training. If you are feeding a high-quality food, vitamin and mineral supplements should not be necessary, although adding small quantities of yogurt, cooked vegetables, or eggs to the food can be beneficial. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

GROOMING

The German Shepherd Dog has a medium-length, double coat consisting of a dense, harsh, and close-lying outer coat with a softer undercoat. The breed is easy to maintain, usually requiring just a quick brushing every few days or so to help remove loose hairs, but they do shed more profusely once or twice a year. During these periods, more frequent brushing will help control the amount of hair that ends up around the house and on the furniture. The German Shepherd only needs an occasional bath. It is important to trim or grind his nails every month if they are not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause pain and structural issues.

Grooming Frequency

Occasional Bath/Brush
Specialty/Professional

2-3 Times a Week Brushing

Infrequent
Frequent

Seasonal

TRAINING

Early socialization and puppy training classes are vital, and continuing obedience training will help ensure that the pup will grow to be an adaptable and well-mannered adult. The German Shepherd is a highly intelligent companion and an extraordinary worker. Consistency and positive, reward-based training will yield excellent results. He is extremely bonded to his people, so he is happiest when he lives with his family. He should be raised in the household and exposed to the family’s activities. The German Shepherd Dog Club of America provides detailed training advice for owners on the club’s website.

Trainability

May be Stubborn
Eager to Please

Independent

Temperament/Demeanor

Aloof/Wary
Outgoing

Alert/Responsive

HEALTH

Most German Shepherds are healthy dogs. A responsible breeder will screen breeding stock for health conditions such as degenerative myelopathy and elbow and hip dysplasia. German Shepherd Dogs can experience bloat, a sudden and life-threatening swelling of the abdomen, and owners should educate themselves about its symptoms and what to do should bloat occur.

 

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Elbow Evaluation

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

EXERCISE

As a very active and athletic breed, the German Shepherd requires lots of exercise for his physical and mental well-being. A dog who is not exercised enough will become frustrated and likely to develop undesirable behaviors. With a puppy, you can start with short daily walks, as well as play sessions in a safely fenced area. Remember to not let the dog off leash, as even the best-trained dog can become distracted and not follow every command. Participating in canine activities such as agilityherdingtracking, and dock diving provides excellent physical and mental exercise and is fun and rewarding for both dog and owner.

Energy Level

Couch Potato
Needs Lots of Activity

Regular Exercise

About the German Shepherd

German Shepherd Dogs can stand as high as 26 inches at the shoulder and, when viewed in outline, presents a picture of smooth, graceful curves rather than angles. The natural gait is a free-and-easy trot, but they can turn it up a notch or two and reach great speeds.

Generally considered dogkind’s finest all-purpose worker, the German Shepherd Dog is a large, agile, muscular dog of noble character and high intelligence. Loyal, confident, courageous, and steady, the German Shepherd is truly a dog lover’s delight.

German Shepherd dogs are often utilized as police dogs, Service dogs, agility dogs, conformation, obedience dogs and sentinels. Their high train-ability and extreme loyalty and commitment make them an excellent choice for any agenda.

There are many reasons why German Shepherds stand in the front rank of canine royalty, but experts say their defining attribute is character: loyalty, courage, confidence, the ability to learn commands for many tasks, and the willingness to put their life on the line in defense of loved ones. German Shepherds will be gentle family pets and steadfast guardians, but, the breed standard says, there’s a “certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships.”

ALL DEPOSITS FOR PUPPIES ARE APPLIED TO THE LITTER OF YOUR CHOICE,
PICK IS SET IN THE ORDER THAT THE DEPOSITS ARE RECEIVED.

Make Reservations

“Our team is very proud of the work we do at Von Reich Haus. Our dogs are champion blood lines, happy, safe and well trained for family, police or military. It is our pleasure to watch our dogs grow into the champions we know they can be". Teresa

History

The German Shepherd Dog (Deutshe Schäferhund) descends from the family of German herding dogs that, until the late 19th century, varied in type from district to district.

In the waning years of the 1800s, a German cavalry officer, Captain Max von Stephanitz, made it his mission to develop the ideal German herder. Von Stephanitz and like-minded breeders crossed various strains from the northern and central districts of Germany, resulting in the ancestors of today’s German Shepherd Dog (GSD).

Von Stephanitz co-founded the world’s first club devoted to GSDs and spent 35 years promoting and refining the breed. Today, the GSD’s versatility is so thoroughly deployed in the performance of myriad tasks that it is easy to forget that the breed was originally created to herd sheep. The GSD’s now-famous qualities—intelligence, agility, speed, stealth, and the overall air of firm authority—were forged not in the police academy but in the sheep pasture.

GSDs became popular in the United States in the early 1900s, thanks in part to the adventures of canine movie stars Rin-Tin-Tin and Strongheart. 

With the rise of modern livestock management and the decline of herding as a canine occupation, von Stephanitz shrewdly promoted his breed as an ideal K-9 worker. The GSD is today the preferred dog for police and military units the world over.

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